Vin de Cru...french for "Vintage Wine' is a weekly exposé and audioblog focusing on exclusive VinVillageRadio guest interviews featuring high-profile, in-depth discussions with the "who's who" in wine and food. Please read, listen and enjoy!

East Coast vs. West Coast Wines

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I know it’s shocking to believe, but good, even great wines are made outside of the West Coast! In fact, the industry started all the way over on my home turf in the East Coast in 1647. Granted, the industry really didn't take off till the 1800s, but it still boasts the earliest plantings in the states.

So, what makes the east coast special? The answer, in a few words, has to do with hybrids and crossings. What!? Well, most of the grape varieties us wine drinkers are accustomed to come from the vine species: vitis vinifera. These are your cabernets, merlots, sauvignon blancs, verdejos, tempranillo, sangiovese, etc...pretty much all vines grown in Europe are of this species.

So, what makes east coast cooler? Unfortunately, they can't grow the variety of vitis vinifera vines as the west coast can...due to the harsher climate, but they do grow a larger range of grape species in general, namely American Native vine species called Vitis labrusco, and vitis riparia amongst a few others. In addition, hybrids and crossings are grown here too! Crosses come from 'crossing' 2 native american vine species. Hybrids are the European Vitis Vinifera species bred with native american species.

Confused? Don't be. Really the point I want you to grasp is that grape vines and wines aren't limited to your West Coast grown, European born varieties that have become household names, but instead, there is a whole world of wine out there waiting to be rediscovered.

Cheers!

Lindsay Pomeroy

VinVillage - Director of Marketing Services
Wine Specialist, Society of Wine Educators
Wine Director, Dussini Mediterranean Bistro

More Reasons to Drink Wine

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I was reading an article in the "Scientific American Mind" about how loss of smell is associated with disorders such as depression. Apparently, certain patients who undergo 'smell training' are able to help recover their sense of smell. Cool, eh?

According to the article, smells evoke emotions and memories..so that fabulous smell of lilacs reminds you of spring in your home. Smell is one of the oldest senses and is strongly associated with emotions, which is why when you have sinus problems, or just can't smell very well you can be prone to depression.

Just another reason why tasting, or more accurately, smelling wine is good for your health!

Cheers!

Lindsay Pomeroy

VinVillage - Director of Marketing Services
Wine Specialist, Society of Wine Educators
Wine Director, Dussini Mediterranean Bistro

 

 

Welcome to Vin de Cru

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Vin de Cru or "Vintage Wine" is a new VinVillage blog focusing on all things about wine.

Lindsay Pomeroy, another resident wine expert and a valued member of the VinVillage team, will be the host of Vin de Cru.

It will be a weekly exposé featuring all things about wine and the "wine-lifestyle" from Lindsay's perspective. It will also include special guest bloggers that Lindsay invites to share their thoughts and experiences relating to all things about wine with our VinVillage members.

We hope your enjoy it.

Cheers, The VinVillage Team